Identifying Issues for the Bright ICT Initiative: A Worldwide Delphi Study of IS Journal Editors and Scholars (CAIS, 2018)

Posted Posted in Research

Information and communication technology (ICT) continues to change business as we know it. As ICT further integrates into our daily lives, it creates more opportunities to both help and hinder fundamental social problems throughout the world. In response to these growing and urgent societal needs, the Association for Information Systems approved the Bright ICT Initiative to extend IS research beyond a focus on business to take on the broader challenges of an ICT-enabled bright society. We conducted a Delphi study to provide guidance on where bright ICT-minded researchers might focus to produce their greatest impact. In this paper, we report on our findings. The Delphi panel comprised 182 globally distributed IS journal editors who participated in a three-round consensus-building process via the Internet. Our results provide a framework of eleven research priority areas and specific research topics for those engaged in future-oriented, socially conscious IS research. Citation: Lee, J. and Fedorowicz, J., 2018. Identifying Issues for the Bright ICT Initiative: A Worldwide Delphi Study of IS Journal Editors and Scholars. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 42, Article 11.

Preventing State-Led Cyberattacks Using the Bright Internet and Internet Peace Principles (JAIS, 2018)

Posted Posted in Research

The Internet has engendered serious cybersecurity problems due to its anonymity, transnationality, and technical shortcomings. This paper addresses state-led cyberattacks (SLCAs) as a particular source of threats. Recently, the concept of the Bright Internet was proposed as a means of shifting the cybersecurity paradigm from self-defensive protection to the preventive identification of malevolent origins through adopting five cohesive principles. To design a preventive solution against SLCAs, we distinguish the nature of SLCAs from that of private-led cyberattacks (PLCAs). We then analyze what can and cannot be prevented according to the principles of the Bright Internet. For this research, we collected seven typical SLCA cases and selected three illustrative PLCA cases with eleven factors. Our analysis demonstrated that Bright Internet principles alone are insufficient for preventing threats from the cyberterror of noncompliant countries. Thus, we propose a complementary measure referred to here as the Internet Peace Principles, which define that the Internet should be used only for peaceful purposes in accordance with international laws and norms. We derive these principles using an approach that combines the extension of physical conventions to cyberspace, the expansion of international cybersecurity conventions to global member countries, and analogical international norms. Based on this framework, we adopt the Charter of the United Nations, the Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts, Recommendations by the United Nations Group of Governmental Experts, the Tallinn Manual, and Treaty of the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, and others as reference norms that we use to derive the consistent international order embodied by the Internet Peace Principles. Citation: Shin, Y.Y., Lee, J.K. and Kim, M., 2018. Preventing State-Led Cyberattacks Using the Bright Internet and Internet Peace Principles. Journal of the Association for Information Systems, 19(3), pp.152-181.

Design and Validation of the Bright Internet (JAIS, 2018)

Posted Posted in Research

Bright Internet research was launched as a core project of the AIS Bright ICT Initiative, which aims to build an ICT-enabled Bright Society. To facilitate research on the Bright Internet, we explicitly define the goals and principles of the Bright Internet, and review the evolution of its principles. The three goals of the Bright Internet are: the realization of preventive security, the provision of the freedom of anonymous expression for innocent netizens, and protection from the risk of privacy infringement that may be caused by preventive security schemes. We respecify design principles to fulfill these seemingly conflicting goals: origin responsibility, deliverer responsibility, identifiable anonymity, global collaboration, and privacy protection. Research for the Bright Internet is characterized by two perspectives: first, the Bright Internet adopts a preventive security paradigm in contrast to the current self-centric defensive protective security paradigm. Second, the target of research is the development and deployment of the Bright Internet on a global scale, which requires the design of technologies and protocols, policies and legislation, and international collaboration and global governance. This research contrasts with behavioral research on individuals and organizations in terms of the protective security paradigm. This paper proposes validation research concerning the principles of the Bright Internet using prevention motivation theory and analogical social norm theory, and demonstrates the need for a holistic and prescriptive design for a global scale information infrastructure, encompassing the constructs of technologies, policies and global collaborations. An important design issue concerns the business model design, which is capable of promoting the propagation of the Bright Internet platform through applications such as Bright Cloud Extended Networks and Bright E-mail platforms. Our research creates opportunities for prescriptive experimental research, and the various design and behavioral studies of the Bright Internet open new horizons toward our common goal of a bright future. Citation: Lee, J.K., Cho, D. and Lim, G.G., 2018. Design and Validation of the Bright Internet. Journal of the Association for Information Systems, 19(2), pp.63-85.

Proceedings of BIGS 2017

Posted Posted in Research

A1. An Attacker-Defender Game in System Exploitation (extended abstract) Kay-Yut Chen1 (University of Texas Arlington), Jingguo Wang (UTA), Laura Marusich (UTA), Jonathan Bakdash (University of Texas Dallas)​ A2. Assessing Electronic Commerce Firms Participating in Rural Development Projects: A Customer-based Platform Brand Equity Perspective​ (extended abstract) Liguo Lou (Chonnam National University), Joon Koh (Chonnam National University), Hyun Shik Yoon (Chonnam National University), and Sang-Joon Lee (Chonnam National University)​ A3. Automatically Detecting the Resonance of Terrorist Movement Frames (extended abstract) ​Ugochukwu Etudo (University of Connecticut) and Victoria Yoon (Virginia Commonwealth University)​ A4. Designing Cloud Computing Services Resilient to Distributed Denial of Service Attacks (extended abstract) ​Sungjune Park, Chandrasekar Subramaniam (University of North Carolina at Charlotte), Nam K. Kim (Chonnam National University), and Won Seok Yang (Hannam University) B1. The Role of Ethical Climate on Employee’s Perceived Security Risk Assessment (extended abstract) Randi Jiang (Louisiana Tech University), Jaeung Lee (Louisiana Tech University), Tom Stafford Louisiana Tech University), and Selwyn Ellis (Louisiana Tech University)​ B2. Optimal Payoff for Selective Traceable Anonymity of a Network System (extended abstract) Rasel Md Mamun (University of North Texas), Bongsik Shin (San Diego State University), Bin Mai (UNT), Shailesh Kuikarmi (UNT), and Dan J. Kim (UNT)​ B3. Perceived Responsibilities of Internet Users on Cybersecurity Issues (extended abstract) Daegon Cho (KAIST), Jaeung Sim (KAIST), and Jae Kyu Lee (KAIST)​ B4. An Investigation of Cyber-rumor Sharing: The Case of Zika Virus (extended abstract) Rohit Valecha (UTSA), Tejaswi Volety (UTSA), Naga Vemprala (UTSA), K. Hazel Kwon (Arizona State University), and H. Raghav Rao (UTSA)​ B5. Managing the Risks of Data Security and Privacy in Cloud Computing: A Shared Responsibility between Vendors and Client Organisations (extended abstract) Anup Shrestha (University of Southern Queensland), Omar Ali (University of Southern Queensland), and Michael Lane (University of Southern Queensland) (See the full details of BIGS 2017 program)

Reflections on ICT-enabled Bright Society Research (ISR, 2016)

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Since the advent of the AIS Grand Vision Project of ICT-enabled Bright Society (in short, Bright ICT), there has been significant excitement as well as confusion about the concept. To resolve ambiguities about the types of research that are consistent with this vision, the notions of Restorative Bright ICT Research and Enriching Bright ICT Research are defined. In addition, we propose three perspectives that can differentiate Bright ICT research from traditional research approaches to create a disruptive impact on society. To address societal problems that are often global in scope, Bright ICT research recommends taking a holistic design of future society encompassing technologies and policies as well as business models driven by visionary principles. This paradigm can be an extension of design science for the scope of a Macro Information Society. Citation: Lee, J.K., 2016. Reflections on ICT-enabled Bright Society Research. Information Systems Research, 27(1), pp.1-5.

Research Framework for AIS Grand Vision of the Bright ICT Initiative (MISQ, 2015)

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The Internet has become a minefield of crime, fakes, and terror perpetuated by anonymous users on a global scale. The security burden of protecting organizations is becoming increasingly difficult and costly, and this burden cannot be lessened under the current Internet protocol. In order to fundamentally solve these side effects, the Council of the Association for Information Systems (AIS) has adopted a grand vision of an ICT-Enabled Bright Society (in short, the Bright ICT Initiative). With the goal of preventing undesirable activities on the Internet, diverse issues can be investigated using a bottom-up perspective. Scholars are beginning to examine the concept and various approaches with the support of the AIS conferences and the information system journals. However, a unique approach and fundamental solution must be identified in order to drastically eliminate the negative side effects of these adverse online activities. In order to achieve this, four principles are proposed that will provide the foundation of the framework for a new and safer Internet platform, the Bright Internet, while protecting users’ privacy at an appropriate level. The proposed principles are origin responsibility, deliverer responsibility, rule-based digital search warrants, and traceable anonymity. This endeavor requires the investigation of technologies, policies, and international agreements on which new business models can be created. Citation: Lee, J.K., 2015. Research Framework for AIS Grand Vision of the Bright ICT Initiative. MIS Quarterly, 39(2), pp.iii-xii.